Home » Attention! 6 Doggy Travel Mistakes To Avoid

Attention! 6 Doggy Travel Mistakes To Avoid

We’ve shared many doggy travel how-to’s these past few weeks, but what about the doggy travel do-not’s? Ample preparation is key to avoiding potential travel mistakes that may put your dog’s health and well-being at risk. Here are our recommendations to keep in mind:

Forgetting your pet’s passport and travel documents

If you’re traveling internationally or flying, it’s crucial you bring all your dog’s documentation. You’ll need a pet passport, which you can read more about HERE, and potentially these forms as well:

  • Pet health certificate
  • Pet health insurance (not mandatory, but recommended)
  • Prove of vaccinations including rabies
  • Rabies titer test (some countries)
  • Import permit (some countries)
  • Parasite treatment (some countries
  • Passport for your pet – collection of all documentation
  • Endorsement of documentation by government veterinarian

Double check what your destination will require and prepare enough time to collect all necessary documents ahead of your departure date. Many of these documents can be requested from your vet.

Forgetting to update pet microchips and/or ID tags

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Check out this advice from Nationwide Pet Insurance: “Scared and in an unfamiliar setting, your pet’s best chance of quickly reuniting with you boils down to information: a durable pet collar and ID tags with up-to-date contact info and a microchip with current contact info (the collar could come loose, so the microchip is a valuable backup).” (Source)

We highly recommend getting your pup microchipped before traveling. This painless procedure will identify you and your pup through a unique number “that can be searched on an owner database by a veterinarian in the case a lost pet is found. Be sure to register your pet’s microchip and keep your contact information current.

Not restraining pets in the car

“In a recent survey sponsored by AAA and pet travel gear company Kurgo, 23% of pet owners said they had used their arms to restrain dogs while applying the brakes. Another 19% took one hand off the wheel to prevent pets from climbing onto the front seat, while 17% admitted to holding dogs in their laps during car rides.” (Source)

You and your dog may feel super comfortable on road trips but that doesn’t mean you should ease up on safety protocols while you’re on the road. We believe your dog should have enough designated space to lay down comfortably (don’t over pack your car!) but they still need to be safely secured at all times. If you ever find yourself in an unfortunate situation on the road, your dog can be saved by having a seat belt on. You can also use a carrier or restraining harness.

Finally, you should never place your dog in the passenger seat because an activated airbag can cause injury or death and never leave your dog unattended in the car, especially on a hot day. To learn more about road tripping with your dog, read our article HERE.

Booking the worst time to fly

There are many things to consider if you put your dog on an airplane (check out our guide HERE). If they absolutely must travel by cargo, you’ll want to keep in mind which time of day the flight is along with the duration of the flight.  Choose an early morning or late night flight to avoid extreme temperatures. Strongly consider direct flights to avoid baggage handling, accidental transfers, and other encounters that may lead to potential mistakes.

Not locating a nearby veterinarian at your destination

We hope you’ll never find yourself in a situation where your pet is in dire need of a vet visit while on a trip, but in the case it ever happens, you’ll be glad you stayed somewhere that’s easily accessible to a veterinarian. You can find a ton of stays through Romingo, including a list of dog-friendly activities and offerings for each stay before booking.

Bringing snacks that might be toxic

Who doesn’t love snacking while they’re traveling? Dogs love it just as much as we do! Accidentally spilling your snacks is bound to happen at some point, which is why we recommend only snacking on foods that can be tolerated by dogs. If your dog is especially food-motivated, they might find a way to steal your snacks if left unattended. You don’t want to deal with a dog who has consumed too many chocolate bars with an upset stomach (or possibly worse).


We hope this list of travel mistakes to avoid will keep you and your pup well-prepared for an upcoming journey! What are some travel how-to’s that have really helped you?  Comment below! Don’t forget to sign up here to get the latest on dog-friendly travel news and updates.

4 thoughts on “Attention! 6 Doggy Travel Mistakes To Avoid”

  1. I need your information. I love traveling with my pups. 2 doggys 18lb dachshund 13lb terrier mix. I live in Southern California in the Inland Empire. What dog friendly hotels, rentals are near me?

    1. We will be launching on the West Coast first in these major cities in Southern California: Los Angeles, Orange County, Palm Springs, and San Diego. Please subscribe so you will get updates when our booking services go live! We are looking to launch November 8 and you can explore all our dog-friendly hotels then. Around Inland Empire are the cities of Palm Springs, OC, and LA. Please don’t hesitate to reach out with any additional questions — you can find us on IG and FB @RomingoTravel.

    2. We will be launching on the West Coast first in these major cities in Southern California: Los Angeles, Orange County, Palm Springs, and San Diego. Please subscribe so you will get updates when our booking services go live! We are looking to launch November 8 and you can explore all our dog-friendly hotels then. Around Inland Empire are the cities of Palm Springs, OC, and LA. Please don’t hesitate to reach out with any additional questions — you can find us on IG and FB @RomingoTravel.

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